Although the massacre at Charlie Hebdo more recently caught the public’s attention, Muslims have been murdering people over Danish cartoons for over a decade.

If you thought the kids protesting at UC Berkeley were ridiculous, there’s a global, decade-long series of Muslim protests, as well as terrorist attacks, stemming from a cartoon in a Danish  newspaper in 2005, with the cartoon-inspired attack that left a dozen dead at Charlie Hebdo being the highest profile comic-based massacre in recent years. It’s akin to widespread protests kindled by a Calvin and Hobbes strip, only it actually happened. Despite the dozens of dead at the hands of religious zealots, Danish minister Inger Støjberg is clearly unfazed, with Breitbart reporting that she defiantly posted a screenshot of her iPad, showing the background image; one of the murder-inducing cartoons from 2005, by her fellow Dane, artist Kurt Westergaard.

Her post was responding to Skovgaard Museum’s decision to censor the cartoons in what would likely be the place they are most appropriate; an exhibit about blasphemy. Her devotion to free speech is evident not only in her willingness to post an image that has gotten many killed, but also in the fact that she maintained the museum’s rights, saying, “It is the museum’s own choice and they have their full right to do it.”

While the museum may have been bullied into self-censorship by a global effort at imposing religious dictates on civil society – Even westernized Muslims petitioned governments to intervene, advocating the start of a de facto global theocracy, even if they condemned the terrorists’ methods. – Støjberg is not so easily shut down, with the image’s caption also stating, “I think we should be proud of the Mohammad cartoons.” 

In explaining why she used the cartoon as her background, she wrote:

I do so because I love Denmark. I simply love the foundations of freedoms which generations before us have laid down and which our country is founded on. Freedoms, which mean that we can believe in whatever god we want, we have freedom of expression, so we can say – and draw – what we think, and here there is complete equality between the sexes.

In contrast, Muslim efforts to explain to the west why it’s okay to kill someone over a cartoon include Iran holding a contest for cartoons mocking the Holocaust, though nobody seems to have been killed over it, so it does make the “but it’s so offensive” argument a bit less convincing. In fact, I don’t recall having ever heard of a terrorist killing anybody over a puerile, offensive holocaust cartoon.

At the end of the day, staging worldwide protests over a comic in a newspaper is among the most childish things that the world has ever taken seriously. It’s a tantrum, but it’s a tantrum that mobilized massive numbers of people eager to impose religious law on a global scale, by petitioning governments to turn their religious law against cartoons into legislation.

Now that the political left has decided to wage war on free speech on campuses across the States, it is encouraging to see people like Støjberg, undeterred by the reprisal killings, waving a huge middle finger at theocracy and censorship.

Feature Image via Breitbart